What is Qigong:

Qigong = Chi/Qi: means ‘energy’ and Gong/Kung means ‘moving’, ‘working’ or ‘manipulating’; so qigong means ‘energy work’. Qigong is the name given to exercises and meditations, which use and direct flow of Qi energy in the body.

Just like tai chi, qigong originates from China and is an ancient form of exercise for health and vitality, having attributes of both tai chi and yoga. In fact, some people call it Chinese yoga.

It as been passed down through the generations and is closely linked to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Although still not very well known in the west it is practised by millions of people all over the world.

Qigong is a discipline that exercises the mind, and combines breathing, posture, movement, stretching and meditation to promote mental and physical health, vitality, flexibility and stamina.

It helps fight stress, increase blood circulation in the body, improve flexibility of the muscles, ligaments and tendons, boost our immune system and energy levels, developing a sense of calm and equilibrium. If practised regularly, it is effective in preventing illness.

All my Bao’s Lung Fei Tai Chi classes have qigong practice as part of their sessions. Qigong is a discipline that exercises the mind, and combines breathing, posture, movement, stretching and meditation to promote mental and physical health, vitality, flexibility and stamina. It helps fight stress, increase blood circulation in the body, improve flexibility of the muscles, ligaments and tendons, boost the immune system and energy levels, developing a sense of calm and equilibrium. If practised regularly, it is effective in preventing illness.

Qigong is fairly easy to learn, but mastering it needs commitment from the practitioner, so persevere in your training. To get information on the difference between qigong and tai chi, please look at the ‘Tai Chi’ page and also look at the tai chi page ‘What to expect’.

Regular practice of qigong helps:

Qigong is used as a healing therapy and regulates the body’s energies in order to prevent, postpone, reduce or even sometimes eliminate suffering caused by disease.

Scientists are now studying qigong and they have noticed that regular practice helps reduce stress and promotes a sense of calm and improves health, vitality in body, mind and spirit.

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DAO YIN YANG SHENG GONG

What is Dao Yin Yang Sheng Gong:

Daoyin Medical Qigong (Dao Yin Yang Sheng Gong) is particularly excellent for our health and well being as it incorporates Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) principles in it’s movements. It has been developed by Professor Zhang Guangde from Beijing Sports University from ancient practices incorporating the principle of Traditional Chinese Medicine to it.

Short history on Professor Zhang Guangde:

Professor Zhang Guangde was born in 1931 and sadly passed away on 30th January 2022. From 1955 he studied at Beijing Sports University, where he progressed over the years from being a student to becoming a Senior Professor at the University.

In 1974 he was diagnosed with serious health issues and he undertook deep studies of Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCM), Dao Yin ancient body and mind unity exercises, and tai chi. He then developed a new style combining of Dao Yin Qigong covering physical exercise, mental cultivation and TCM principles which he called ‘Dao Yin Yang Sheng Gong’, and he overcame his own illness with it’s regular practice.

In China his method of Dao Yin Yang Sheng Gong is officially recognised by the Ministry of Health and incorporated into the nation’s fitness programme, as well as used in hospitals and sanatorium, offering hope to thousands of patients suffering from a wide range of medical conditions.

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CHINESE HEALTH QIGONG

What is “Chinese Health Qigong”:

They are redeveloped and updated ancient sets of Chinese Qigong exercises by Chinese professors of qigong, TCM and sports. In 2002 the first 4 sets were introduced all over China, and since then spread all over the world.

When they first came out Mrs Men X. Bao, the founder of our club, required all her trained teachers learning and teaching these 4 sets which are:

  1. Ba Duan Jin (8 Brocades),
  2. Wu Qin Xi (5 Animal Frolics),
  3. Yi Jin Jing (Transforming muscle-and-tendon),
  4. Liu Zi Jue (6 Healing Sounds)

More sets were developed and added after that, including Dao Yin Yang Sheng Gong Shi Er Fa (12 step Daoyin Health Preservation Exercises) created by Professor Zhang Guangde from Beijing Sports University. You will find that set under the Daoyin Qigong.

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SHIBASHI – Tai Chi Qigong

What is Shibashi:

Shibashi simply means ’18 movements’ in Chinese, and consist of qigong exercises, inspired by tai chi, created and developed by Sifu Lin Housheng.

Our tai chi classes all have qigong as part of their curriculum and the Shibashi first and second routines are part of the qigong practised in the club’s tai chi and qigong classes.

Short history on Sifu Lin Housheng:

Lin Housheng was born in China in 1939.

When fifteen, he began studying with a Southern Shaolin monk.

Lin Housheng graduated at Shanghai Physical Education University in 1964, in aquatic sports and Wushu (martial arts/Kung Fu).

In 1979, Lin Housheng combined elements of qigong and, modified and simplified Yang style tai chi to create his first set of eighteen movements.

The second set was created in 1988, based with elements from Chen style tai chi and tai chi sword. (Other sets were later created in the 1990’s and in the new century).

As well as in China, Lin Housheng has travelled world wide promoting shibashi, especially in South-east Asia countries, such as Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and also in the United States, Canada, Australia, Great Britain, France, Germany, etc. Currently, over 10 million people around the world are practising shibashi exercises. Even some South-east Asian countries are promoting shibashi as a national health exercise.

In 1989 Lin Housheng came to the United States to participate in a research project at the University of San Diego. In 2010, he became a United States citizen.

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